Kazvin 2017-04-21T17:44:59+00:00

Kazvin

The look: If you have inherited a rug from your parents or grandparents, good chances are that your inheritance includes an antique Kazvin (also spelled Qazvin or Gazvin) persian rug. Kazvins usually have ornamental curvature in their patterns. Today, Kazvin itself does not produce rugs. The last year of production of the Kazvin was around 1930-1935. You could find some tribal patterns that are made in surrounding villages of Kazvin and selling as Kazvin. Kazvin rugs and carpets have similar looks and patterns of Kashans or Bijars.

The general feel for quality: The quality of Kazvin rugs varies. The older (knotted before circa 1930’s) are very good, but some of the newer ones may have a lower number of knots per square inch (kpsi). Newer, finer Kazvins can tend to be harder to find.

Watch out for: You could find some tribal patterns that are made in surrounding villages of Kazvin and selling as Kazvin.

Shape and style: Kazvin rugs have different sizes and the majority of them are mid size (4×6 to 8×10 feet).

Color: Dark red and powerful blue colors are the predominate colors, with ivory as the elgant contrast color. Ivory-dominated Kazvins are more unique.

Pile texture: Soft wool, thin, tight piles.

Foundation: Warps are mostly cotton,wefts either cotton or wool.

Solomon’s finest sources: Kazvin is located in a vast plain west of Tehran. The city was founded as an outpost in the time of Sassanid persian empire during the reign of Shapour I, known famously as Shad Shapour, in order to prevent any invasions. The area then gradually developed as the main nucleus of Kazvin.